• We can’t standardize the sanctification process. Churches like programs, but God works differently in each person.
  • Sins aren’t things you do; sin is about who you are.
  • Spiritual quick fixes are unhelpful.
  • It’s okay not to be okay, but it’s not okay to stay there.
  • A process that is organic but controlled is effective – take the relational elements of organic and put them into the structure of a system. For example – a 5-week series on a topic that is explored deeper in small groups, children’s church, and family devotionals is structured; other seasons are not so structured.
  • Discipleship means more than studying a book together. It means opening our lives to the people we are leading.
  • Mentoring cannot be programmatic. It must be relational. Help the patriarchs of the church understand the value of these relationships and then set them free to fish for people in the church with whom they connect naturally.
  • Covenant membership – a clear understanding of what being a part of the church meant, from being serious about sanctification to being submitted to leadership.
  • Leaders shouldn’t wield authority; they should shepherd toward truth.
  • We are to shepherd with authority but not become tyrants.
  • Paul is unbelievably aggressive when it comes to putting sin to death. But there is often a sit-on-the-couch-and-wait-for-God-to-do-something mentality that is unbiblical and wicked. There seems to be so little war in some people when it comes to sin.
  • There is a strong victim mentality in mid to young generations. It’s spiritual laziness. They will agree that God is sovereign over all, but then say, “Well, I wish he would sovereignly take away my lust issue.” There’s not a lot of fortitude or fight in them.
  • Some people are meant to wrestle with their sin a long time before God brings them to freedom, but let’s wrestle. Let’s fight.
  • Here’s the real question: What stirs your affections for Jesus Christ? And what robs you of those affections? Many of the things that stifle growth are morally neutral.
  • We want people to think beyond simply what is right and wrong. We want them to fill their lives with things that stir their affections for Jesus Christ and, as best as they can, to walk away from those things that rob those affections — even when they’re not immoral.
  • What’s been missing in the church: transcendence. True encounters with the living God rather than a religion of moral control.
  • Keep church lean, stripped-down, and program-lite. That encourages people to be out in the community rather than dependent on the church.
  • Church buildings teach people. How they’re set up, challenges with them, work it takes to maintain them – all of it teaches people.
  • The people who win their friends to Christ are the ones who baptize them.